Yours, for Probably Always by Janet Somerville

Enter for your chance to win one of 10 signed copies of "Yours, for Probably Always: Martha Gellhorn's Letters of Love and War, 1930-1949" by Janet Somerville. This is an intimate and illuminating collection of letters written by Martha Gellhorn and the extraordinary people with whom she corresponded in the most active years of her life. Gellhorn was a trailblazing war correspondent and novelist best known, to her dismay, as Ernest Hemingway's third wife.

Wildflower Hope by Grace Greene

In the second novel in the Wildflower House series, the author of The Memory of Butterflies reminds us that to achieve our dreams, we must first open our hearts.

Kara Hart suffered overwhelming heartache when she lost her mother and husband, and her father’s sudden death might be the blow that breaks her—unless she turns her grief into purpose. She’ll finish renovating his Victorian mansion in rural Virginia, but with her own twist. She’ll turn the old house into a creative retreat for artists and writers.

Kara has never tackled a project this big alone, and she’s not ready to open her heart to others for help. But the locals open their hearts to her—including two who have the potential to be more than friends. She tells herself she doesn’t need romance or distractions, but maybe that’s exactly what she needs. When her former best friend reenters Kara’s life, it could be the distraction that finally destroys her—or heals her.

The tragedies in Kara’s life have damaged her self-confidence, but she presses forward, gradually lowering her protective walls and allowing others in little by little. Will bringing Wildflower House back to life and freeing her own creative spirit also allow her to open her heart to hope and happiness—and maybe even love?

How Fires End by Marco Rafalà

A dark secret born out of World War II lies at the heart of a Sicilian American family in this emotional and sweeping saga of guilt, revenge, and, ultimately, redemption.

After soldiers vacate the Sicilian hillside town of Melilli in the summer of 1943, the locals celebrate, giving thanks to their patron saint, Sebastian. Amid the revelry, all it takes is one fateful moment for the destiny of nine-year-old Salvatore Vassallo to change forever. When his twin brothers are killed playing with an unexploded mortar shell, Salvatore’s faith is destroyed. As the family unravels, and fear ignites among their neighbors that the Vassallo name is cursed, one tragedy begets another.

Desperate to escape this haunting legacy, Salvatore accepts the help of an Italian soldier with fascist ties who ushers him and his sister, Nella, into a new beginning in America. In Middletown, Connecticut, in the immigrant neighborhood known as Little Melilli, these three struggle to build new lives for themselves. But a dangerous choice to keep their secrets hidden erupts in violence decades later. When Salvatore loses his inquisitive American-born son, David, they all learn too late the price sons pay for their fathers’ wars.

Written with elegiac prose, How Fires End delves into the secret wars of men; the sins they cannot bury; and a life lived in fear of who will reveal them, who will survive them, and who will forgive them.

The Sea of Lost Girls by Carol Goodman

Tess has worked hard to keep her past buried, where it belongs. Now she’s the wife to a respected professor at an elite boarding school, where she also teaches. Her seventeen-year-old son, Rudy, whose dark moods and complicated behavior she’s long worried about, seems to be thriving: he has a lead role in the school play and a smart and ambitious girlfriend. Tess tries not to think about the mistakes she made eighteen years ago, and mostly, she succeeds.

And then one more morning she gets a text at 2:50 AM: it’s Rudy, asking for help. When Tess picks him up she finds him drenched and shivering, with a dark stain on his sweatshirt. Four hours later, Tess gets a phone call from the Haywood school headmistress: Lila Zeller, Rudy’s girlfriend, has been found dead on the beach, not far from where Tess found Rudy just hours before.

As the investigation into Lila’s death escalates, Tess finds her family attacked on all sides. What first seemed like a tragic accidental death is turning into something far more sinister, and not only is Tess’s son a suspect but her husband is a person of interest too. But Lila’s death isn’t the first blemish on Haywood’s record, and the more Tess learns about Haywood’s fabled history, the more she realizes that not all skeletons will stay safely locked in the closet.

The Library Book by Susan Orlean

Susan Orlean’s bestseller and New York Times Notable Book is “a sheer delight…as rich in insight and as varied as the treasures contained on the shelves in any local library” (USA TODAY)—a dazzling love letter to a beloved institution and an investigation into one of its greatest mysteries. “Everybody who loves books should check out The Library Book” (The Washington Post).

On the morning of April 28, 1986, a fire alarm sounded in the Los Angeles Public Library. The fire was disastrous: it reached two thousand degrees and burned for more than seven hours. By the time it was extinguished, it had consumed four hundred thousand books and damaged seven hundred thousand more. Investigators descended on the scene, but more than thirty years later, the mystery remains: Did someone purposefully set fire to the library—and if so, who?

Weaving her lifelong love of books and reading into an investigation of the fire, award-winning New Yorker reporter and New York Times bestselling author Susan Orlean delivers a “delightful…reflection on the past, present, and future of libraries in America” (New York magazine) that manages to tell the broader story of libraries and librarians in a way that has never been done before.

In the “exquisitely written, consistently entertaining” (The New York Times) The Library Book, Orlean chronicles the LAPL fire and its aftermath to showcase the larger, crucial role that libraries play in our lives.