The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee

About the Author: David Treuer

David Treuer is an Ojibwe Indian from Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota He is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize, and fellowships from the NEH, Bush Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation He divides his time between his home on the Leech Lake Reservation and Minneapolis He is the author of three novels and a book of criticism His essays and stories have appeared in Esquire, TriQua


[Read] ➲ The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee  ➮ David Treuer – Theheartwork.co.uk
  • Kindle Edition
  • 526 pages
  • The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee
  • David Treuer
  • English
  • 13 June 2017

The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee A Sweeping History And Counter Narrative Of Native American Life From The Wounded Knee Massacre To The Present Dee Brown S 1970 Bury My Heart At Wounded Knee Was The First Truly Popular Book Of Indian History Ever Published But It Promulgated The Impression That American Indian History Essentially Ended With The 1890 Massacre At Wounded Knee That Not Only Did One Hundred Fifty Sioux Die At The Hands Of The U S Cavalry But Native Civilization Did As Well Growing Up Ojibwe On A Reservation In Minnesota, Training As An Anthropologist, And Researching Native Life Past And Present For His Nonfiction And Novels, David Treuer Uncovered A Different Narrative Instead Of Disappearing, And Despite Or Perhaps Because Of Intense Struggles To Preserve Their Language, Their Culture, Their Very Families, The Story Of American Indians Since The End Of The Nineteenth Century To The Present Is One Of Unprecedented Growth And Rebirth In The Heartbeat Of Wounded Knee, Treuer Melds History With Reportage And Memoir Beginning With The Tribes Devastating Loss Of Land And The Forced Assimilation Of Their Children At Government Run Boarding Schools, He Shows How The Period Of Greatest Adversity Also Helped To Incubate A Unifying Native Identity He Traces How Conscription In The US Military And The Pull Of Urban Life Brought Indians Into The Mainstream And Modern Times, Even As It Steered The Emerging Shape Of Their Self Rule And Spawned A New Generation Of Resistance In Addition, Treuer Explores How Advances In Technology Allowed Burgeoning Indian Populations Across The Continent To Come Together As Never Before, Fostering A Political Force Photographs, Maps, And Other Visuals, From Period Advertisements To Little Known Historical Photos, Amplify The Sense Of Accessing A Fascinating And Untold Story The Heartbeat Of Wounded Knee Is An Essential, Intimate History And Counter Narrative Of A Resilient People In A Transformative Era.

10 thoughts on “The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee

  1. Meike says:

    If you want to know America if you want to see it for what it is you need to look at Indian history and the Indian present In a mixture of history book, reportage, and m moir, Ojibwe author David Treuer tells the story of Native America after the massacre at Wounded Knee, and by doing so, he is resisting the toxic narrative of the vanishing Indian and the tendency to view all Native history as a history of pain This does not mean that Treuer doesn t adress the injustice, oppression, and violence Native people had to endure he certainly does but he underlines the resourcefulness, strength, and persistence of Native tribes that have fought back, protested, resisted, forced new laws, made allies on all sides, claimed their rights and remained loud and visible, no matter what some representatives of the settler state came up with to prevent that This is a book about dignity and perception, about perspective and awareness, and...

  2. Angie says:

    Treuer characterizes this book as 3 journeys in his introduction a journey into history, a journey across America, and a journey into himself and his identity He describes all three of theses journeys with great skill, although the historical journey does get a little dry here and there, and his inward journey makes the narrative a little Minnesota oriented than it would be coming from someone else that s a plus for me After his introduction, which by the end made me want to stand up and cheer, he covers Native American history from prehistoric times to 1890 Wounded Knee in a little over 80 pages The story methodically moves from region to region, giving us a sense of the diversity of Native American history and identity This history is a review, and is just as soul crushing as I expected it to be, but it was well written and engaging And within it, Treuer uses that phrase of his that characterizes this book for me And yet Despite the raging forest fire of white Americans through Native lives and culture, many tribes survived, held on Then Treuer describes the fledgling new life springing up here and there through the next ...

  3. Emily Goenner says:

    How can I not know the things written here As Anglo Americans, we ve been taught such lies and shaded stories This book gives a different side, another heart breaking view of all the evil done by Europeans when they arrived in America I was fascinated to learn so much and horrified that I didn t know it While I would like to hand this book to everyone and say, read this, it isn t an easy read More like a history book than a personal narrative of which I would have liked , its long and detailed and takes some work to make it through I could see Treuer s training in this book anthropology PhD In the end, though, the readers who put in the time and effort will be rewarded with a fuller understanding of his...

  4. Ruby says:

    This is a great book if you want to learn about Native Americans and their history since Wounded Knee in 1890 Much of it is first person, when the author speaks with a variety of fellow Native Americans on a variety of subjects The author also does a great job of laying out the history of Native American tribes after Wounded Knee, including ever changing government policies, including one called termination, and how various tribes responded He is also honest about problems besetting Native ...

  5. Loring Wirbel says:

    David Treuer, an Ojibwe from Leech Lake Reservation, says he doesn t want a new history of North American indigenous tribes to follow the trajectory of Dee Brown s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee or Peter Matthiessen s In the Spirit of Crazy Horse Rather than emphasize tragedy and the repression of Indians through colonial and U.S history, Treuer wants to focus on the survival and victory of North American tribes, even if victories can seem rather small at times In any event, Treur s book is less a history than a personal narrative combined with threads that try to carry the reader through the recent history of tribes in the aftermath of the 1890 defeat at Wounded Knee.The first part of the book does try to provide a history of tribes from prehistoric settlements to the 19th century defeat of the Plains tribes There are places where Treuer does a great job, particularly with the Seminoles in Florida, and the melding of tribes west of the Mississippi following the Trail of Tears Nevertheless, there are gaps here, even in a recap not intended to be comprehensive Where is Tecumseh, and the battles around the Great Lakes Where is Little Turtle, and the battles to suppress the Miamis in southern Indiana and Ohio These ...

  6. Sam toer says:

    In the 1970 work Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee , Dee Brown declared that the culture and civilization of the American Indian was destroyed In The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee David Treuer revise that image of the Indian which has long been prevalent in American literature and historiography The Indians are seen as the Vanishing Amer...

  7. Randall Wallace says:

    Wizard of Oz author L Frank Baum wrote of Native Americans, Having wronged them for centuries we had better, in order to protect civilization, follow it up with one wrong and wipe these untamed and untamable creatures from the face of the earth Charming By the 1600 s the colonial powers had shifted their focus from exploitative colonization to exploitive settlement Thomas Jefferson writes in secret memos to William Henry Harrison in 1803, a plan to disappear the tribes of the Southeast Jefferson writes, They must see that we only have to shut our hand to crush them Then he says that driving them across the Mississippi as the only condition of peace, would be an example to others, and a furtherance of our final consolidation An example to others These guys aren t the Founding Fathers, but the Founding Settler Colonialists Washington too with all those land deals on Native Soil backed by guns Calloway s GW book Parts of California were once populated by Indians in a density that rivaled Europe at that time Evidence of seventeen thousand years of Native history exist in California The paradise became a wasteland and the genocide of the Californian Native was on The degree of violence in the Gold...

  8. Amber says:

    Before I share my thoughts, a few caveats This is my reading experience and reactions to the book I am not academically qualified to comment on the historical accuracy of the contents I am also not culturally qualified to comment on how it represents Native experiences and cultures I picked up this book to re educate myself about Native American history and present day realities, though it has affected me much profoundly than I anticipated..There are a few books that have completely reoriented my view of American history The Devil in the Grove The Sun Also Shines We Were Eight Years in Power I ll now be adding The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee to that list This book takes time and intent at 450 pages long and dense with historical facts, you need to commit to reading it and digesting what it has to say But it is so, so worth it, and it s one I encourage others, especially white people, to invest in reading..Though the title refers to Native history from 1890 to the present, the book deals with the full arc from contact with colonizers to today His narrative focuses on continental tribes, jumping from tribe to tribe and coast to coast as he winds his way through history and the story of so many people at once diverse, but increasingly swept up into an all encompassing, singular status as Indian I...

  9. James Murphy says:

    Always interested in American Indians through my background of anthropology and history, I was drawn to The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee by that but also by its claim to be a counter narrative to Dee Brown s famous 1970 work Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee which was considered the Indian side of the history of the west but which I thought too sentimentally told Treuer s book is balanced He sees the sentimentality, too, but he also criticizes Brown for his portrayal of Indian life as ultimately descended into poverty, 2d class citizenship, and reservation squalor Where Brown s title suggested a surrender to victimhood and the death of a way of life, Treuer sends a message that the Indian heart today strongly and confidently beats.This is a history of Native America during the 129 years since the fight at Wounded Knee, South Dakota between the Lakota Sioux and the 7th Cavalry, considered the last resistance by Indians against the westward reaching modern society overrunning the continent It s thought of as the moment when America s frontier period ended It s true that the estimated population of 5 million indigenous peop...

  10. Liz Mc2 says:

    I listened to the audiobook, read by actress Tanis Parenteau, who is M tis The motto of this book could be not dead yet Treuer writes partly in response to Dee Brown s Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, which depicts Indians primarily as victims, and as people of the past Treuer takes Wounded Knee or less as the starting point of his book, though he does do a broad history of earlier periods, including pre contact and first contact periods Nor does he deny the wrongs done to Native Americans by military, political, and economic means But his focus is on how they have adapted, resisted, and survived, how they are present in the US today, continuing to shape history, not wiped out Maybe it s just because it s fresh in my mind, but I particularly liked his examination of the DAPL protests, which were a loss but also a win in that they politicized a lot of people and created a template for coordinating future protests and strategic alliances The book covers a lot of ground but is very ...